Weekend Read Authors: Hall of Fame

Nuala O'Connor

Nuala O’Connor

Nuala O’Connor (aka Nuala Ní Chonchúir) was born in Dublin, Ireland, she lives in East Galway. Her fifth short story collection Joyride to Jupiter was published by New  Island in 2017; her story ‘Consolata’ from that collection was shortlisted for Short Story of the Year at the 2017 Irish Book Awards.Nuala’s third novel, Miss Emily, about the poet Emily  Dickinson and her Irish maid, was shortlisted for the Eason Book Club Novel of the Year 2015 and longlisted for the 2017 International DUBLIN Literary Award.Nuala’s fourth novel, Becoming Belle, will be published in August 2018.Nuala is a long-time mentor to  creative writing students at Irish universites, currently at NUI Maynooth and also with Words Ireland.

Ruby Cowling

Ruby Cowling

Ruby Cowling was born in West Yorkshire and now lives in London writing short and long fiction. Her work has won awards including The White Review Short Story Prize, the London Short Story Prize, and the Prolitzer Prize from Prole magazine. She is a Finalist for this year’s Gertrude Stein Award and has been shortlisted in contests from Glimmer Train, Short Fiction, and Aesthetica, among others. Recent publication credits include Lighthouse; The Letters Page; The Lonely Crowd; Unthology 4; the Galley Beggar Press Singles Club; I Am Because You Are (a Freight Books collection of work inspired by the theory of General Relativity); Flamingo Land and Other Stories, from Flight Press; and Unreal City: Constructing the Capital, forthcoming in June from Cours de Poétique.

Anne Griffin

Anne Griffin

Anne Griffin’s work has appeared in The Irish Times, The Stinging Fly, The Lonely Crowd and The Ogham Stone amongst others. In 2016 she was shortlisted for the Hennessy New Irish Writing award. Anne has also been longlisted for the Seán Ó Faoláin and Fish Short Story awards. A graduate of University College Dublin’s MA in creative writing programme, Anne has recently completed her first novel. For many years Anne worked for Waterstone’s Booksellers in both Dublin and London. A native of Dublin, she now lives in the heart of Ireland’s midlands where she is surrounded by lakes that take her breath away.

Alison Moore

Alison Moore

Alison Moore’s first novel, The Lighthouse, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Awards, winning the McKitterick Prize. Her most recent novel is Death and the Seaside. Her short fiction has been included in Best British Short Stories and Best British Horror anthologies, broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra and collected in The Pre-War House and Other Stories.

Jess Kidd

Jess Kidd

Jess Kidd completed her first degree in Literature with The Open University, and has since taught creative writing and gained a PhD in Creative Writing Studies. Jess is now developing her own original TV projects with leading UK and International TV producers. She has also worked as a support worker specialising in acquired brain injury. In 2016, Jess won the Costa Short Story Award for ‘Dirty Little Fishes’ and her debut novel Himself was selected for the
BBC Radio 2 Book Club and shortlisted for the Irish Book Awards. In 2017, Himself was shortlisted for the Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award and longlisted for the CWA John Creasey (New Blood) Dagger.

Pippa Goldschmidt

Pippa Goldschmidt

Pippa Goldschmidt lives in Edinburgh and enjoys writing fiction about science. She’s the author of the novel The Falling Sky, the short story collection The Need for Better Regulation of Outer Space, and co-editor (with Tania Hershman) of I Am Because You Are (all published by Freight Books until they went bust recently).

Her poetry, stories and non-fiction have been published in a variety of places including Gutter, the Scottish Review of Books, New York Times, and also broadcast on BBC Radio 4.

In 2016, she was a winner of the MRC Suffrage Science award (for women in science) and her poem ‘Physics for unwary students’ was chosen to be one of the Scottish Poetry Library’s Best Scottish Poems.

Anna Stewart

Anna Stewart

Anna Stewart recently won a 2017 Scottish Book Trust New Writers Award. Her stories have been published in Riptide Journal, New Writing Dundee, and Gutter: The Magazine of New Scottish Writing. In 2015 her story, ‘A Composed Man’ was shortlisted for Bloody Scotland’s Short Story Competition, and she won ‘The Dragons’ Pen’ at Edinburgh International Book Festival back in 2010. Her play ‘Nan’ was part of ‘Reclaim The F Word’ at the Tron Theatre in 2013, and ‘Point Blank Hotel’ performed at the Pleasance Theatre, Islington in 2008. Anna has also performed in Saabruken, Germany and The Act Festival in Bilbao with her devised sci-fi solo performance ‘Contact’. In 2013 she was invited to take part in The National Theatre of Scotland’s development week at Cove Park where she spent time working on her play, ‘Story of The Deer’. She gained an MLitt in Creative Writing with Distinction from The University of St. Andrews in 2010, and a BA (hons) degree in Theatre from Dartington College of Arts in 2004.

Lucy Ives

Lucy Ives

Lucy Ives is the author of the novel Impossible Views of the World (2017), as well as several books of poetry and short prose. In 2019, her second novel, Loudermilk, or the Real Poet, or the Origin of the World, will appear. She is currently Fellow-in-Residence at the Center for Experimental Humanities at NYU.

Becky Tipper

Becky Tipper

Becky Tipper writes short fiction and non-fiction, often inspired by motherhood. Her writing has appeared in publications including Prole, Literary Mama, The Lampeter Review, and in an anthology of contemporary fairy tales from Mother’s Milk Books. She has won the Bridport Prize for flash fiction, and her other very short stories have featured in National Flash Fiction Day anthologies. Her story ‘The Rabbit’ was the runner-up in the Society of Authors’ Tom-Gallon Award, 2017.

Janet Thomas

Janet Thomas

Janet Thomas is a freelance editor living in Aberystwyth.  She has worked in publishing since leaving university.  She and Penny Thomas started Firefly Press, a specialist children’s publisher, in 2013.  She’s also been part of Honno Welsh Women’s Press since 2001, first as Editor and then as part of the Management Committee.  Her children’s picture book Can I Play?, illustrated by Alison Bartlett and published by Egmont, won a Practical Pre-School Gold Award and her story ‘Button Owl’ was read on the CBeebies series Driver Dan’s Story Train, a series created by Rebecca Elgar.  The story ‘Rash’ is very close to her heart and she hopes readers will enjoy it.

Heather Pearson, founder of TheGrantidote.com, writes, collects and provokes stories, poetry and community centering the experiences and impact of women and girls. Before #MeToo, Mathematics was previously published in The Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual. This short story explores endemically sexist everyday contexts as well as documenting healing and, ultimately, an unlikely feminist journey. Heather is currently writing her first novel, is the Managing Editor at Fearless Femme and lives in Edinburgh.
Heather Pearson

Heather Pearson

Heather Pearson, founder of TheGrantidote.com, writes, collects and provokes stories, poetry and community centering the experiences and impact of women and girls. Before #MeToo, ‘Mathematics’ was previously published in The Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual. This short story explores endemically sexist everyday contexts as well as documenting healing and, ultimately, an unlikely feminist journey. Heather is currently writing her first novel, is the Managing Editor at Fearless Femme and lives in Edinburgh.

Daisy Johnson

Daisy Johnson

Daisy Johnson was born in 1990 and currently lives in Oxford. Her short fiction has appeared in The Boston Review and The Warwick Review, among others. In 2014, she was the recipient of the 2014 AM Heath prize.

Elizabeth Reeder

Elizabeth Reeder

Elizabeth Reeder, originally from Chicago, lives in Scotland and is the author of two critically acclaimed novels ‘Ramshackle’ & ‘Fremont’. ‘Ramshackle’ was shortlisted for the Saltire First Book of the Year. Her stories and experimental essays are widely published and broadcast and often explore questions of cartography, identity, ambiguity, family and memory. ‘One Year’, a digital chapbook of her lyric essays, is published by Essay Press (2016). ‘Digressions: On Essaying in the UK’ – curated interviews with publishers, editors and writers on the experimental essay, is a critical companion to ‘One Year’ and was published in 2016, also by Essay Press. Recently she has been writing about fire, archives and whisky. She is lecturer in Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow, is represented by Laura Macdougall at United Agents, and is a MacDowell colony Fellow. You can find her online elizabethkreeder.com and on twitter @ekreeder

Irenosen Okojie

Irenosen Okojie

Irenosen Okojie is a writer and Arts Project Manager. Her debut novel, Butterfly Fish won a Betty Trask award. Her work has been featured in The Observer, The Guardian, the BBC and the Huffington Post amongst other publications. Her short stories have been published internationally. She was presented at the London Short Story Festival by Ben Okri as a dynamic writing talent to watch and was featured in the Evening Standard Magazine as one of London’s exciting new authors. Her short story collection Speak Gigantular published by Jacaranda Books was shortlisted for the Jhalak Prize and is longlisted for the Edgehill Short Story Prize. Twitter: @IrenosenOkojie

 

Bernie McGill

Bernie McGill

Bernie McGill is the author of Sleepwalkers, a collection of stories short-listed in 2014 for the Edge Hill short story prize, and of The Butterfly Cabinet (named in 2012 by Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes as his novel of the year). Her latest novel, The Watch House, is set on Rathlin Island in 1898 at the time of the Marconi wireless experiments. She has been published in the UK, the US and in translation in Italy and the Netherlands. Her work has been placed in the Seán Ó Faoláin, the Bridport, and the Michael McLaverty short story prizes and she won the Zoetrope: All-Story award in the US in 2008. Her short fiction has appeared in acclaimed anthologies The Long Gaze Back, The Glass Shore and Female Lines, all by New Island Books, and for the theatre she has written The Haunting of Helena Blunden and The Weather Watchers.

Bernie has an MA in Irish Writing from Queen’s University, Belfast, and is the recipient of a number of Arts Council of Northern Ireland awards. In 2013 she was granted a research bursary from the Society of Authors. She lives in Portstewart in Northern Ireland with her family, works as a professional mentor with the Irish Writers’ Centre and as a writer in schools for Poetry Ireland. In September 2018 she takes up a Fellowship with the Royal Literary Fund at Queen’s University, Belfast.

Molia Dumbleton

Molia Dumbleton

Molia Dumbleton’s short fiction been awarded First Prize in Ireland’s Seán Ó Faoláin International Short Story Competition and Dromineer Literary Festival Flash Fiction Competition. She has been recognized as a Finalist for the Glimmer Train Very Short Fiction Award; short-listed for the Bath Flash Fiction Award; long-listed for the Fish Short Story Prize and Bath Short Story Award; nominated for Best New American Voices and a Pushcart Prize; and honored with a Kenyon Review Peter Taylor Fellowship. Her work has appeared in literary journals including The Kenyon Review Online, New England Review, Witness, and Great Jones Street. She holds an M.A. from Northwestern University and an M.A. from Rice University, and teaches Creative Writing at DePaul University’s School for New Learning. You can find her at moliadumbleton.com

Magda Knight

Magda Knight

Magda Knight is the Founding Editor-In-Chief of feminist alternative lifestyle site Mookychick.co.uk. Her heart belongs to coffee, gin, beasts, attics, woody perfumes and anything with a noon shadow, although not necessarily in that order. She always carries a basket of apples on the train in case it breaks down for a number of days and the wolves come. Her short stories for adults, young adults and children have been published in various anthologies and publications including Derby Shorts (For Books’ Sake), Carnage: After the End (Siren’s Call Publications), Into The Woods (Hic Dragones), The End Was Not the End (Seventh Star Press) and the British comic 2000AD. Two of her unpublished YA novels were longlisted for the Mslexia Children’s Book Awards in 2012. Her most recent unpublished YA novel, Star Burn, was shortlisted for the Commonword Diversity Writing for Children Prize in 2016 and an excerpt is due to be published in the Commonword Paper Mirrors anthology in 2018. You can find her on Twitter at @MagdaKnight

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah

Ubah Cristina Ali Farah was born in Verona, Italy, of a Somali father and an Italian mother. She grew up in Mogadishu but fled at the outbreak of the civil war at the age of eighteen. She is a poet, novelist, playwright, and oral performer. She taught Somali language and culture at Roma Tre University and is currently based in Brussels. She has published stories and poems in several anthologies and in 2006 she won the Lingua Madre National Literary Prize. Her novel Madre piccola (2007) was awarded the prestigious Vittorini Prize and has been translated into Dutch and English.

Mallory Soto

Mallory Soto

Mallory Soto is a short story writer from New York. She has named every pigeon she has ever met and applies the ten second rule to humanity: It’s still good.

Stefanie Seddon

Stefanie Seddon

Stefanie Seddon’s short stories have won the 2016 Bristol Short Story Prize and the Commonwealth Short Story Prize for Europe & Canada, and have appeared on Granta.com, addastories.org, and in The Mechanics’ Institute Review and the Bristol Prize Anthology. Stefanie grew up on a farm in New Zealand and has recently completed an MA in Creative Writing at Birkbeck, University of London. She is currently working on a novel inspired by the high country landscapes of her native New Zealand.

Carys Brays

Carys Bray

Carys Bray is a short story writer and novelist. Her debut collection Sweet Home won the Scott Prize and her debut novel A Song for Issy Bradley won the Author’s Club First Novel Award. Her second novel, The Museum of You, is published in June 2016.

Desiree Reynolds

Desiree Reynolds

Desiree Reynolds is a broadcaster, creative writing workshop facilitator, DJ and mentor. She has had short stories published in various publications, including A Generation Defining Itself, Hair: A Journey into the Afro and Asian Experience, Moss Side Stories, The Suitcase Book of Love Poems and Tangled Roots. Desiree is inspired by internal landscapes and collective memory. Seduce is her first novel. She is currently working on a collection of short stories, based on growing up in South London and a novel about the collapse of the plantation system in the Caribbean.

 

Sophie Mackintosh

Sophie Mackintosh

Sophie Mackintosh was born in South Wales in 1988, and is currently based in London. Her fiction and poetry has been published in Granta, The White Review, TANK Magazine and more. Her short story ‘Grace’ is the winner of the 2016 White Review Short Story Prize, and her short story ‘The Running Ones’ won the 2016 Stylist & Virago Gothic Short Story Competition. Find Sophie on Twitter as @fairfairisles

Ruby Speechley

Ruby Speechley

Ruby Speechley completed the Faber Academy Novel Writing course in 2016 and has an MA in Writing from Sheffield Hallam University. She won Best Opening Chapter at the 2017 Festival of Writing in York and was runner-up in the Perfect Pitch competition. Her novel is long listed in the Caledonia Novel Award 2018. Ruby’s short stories are published in Earlyworks Press and Retreat West anthologies and her most recent work has been accepted by The Cabinet of Heed and Reflex Fiction. In a former life, Ruby wrote for several publications including, The Daily Telegraph and The Independent.

 

Meaghan Delahunt

Meaghan Delahunt

Meaghan Delahunt is a novelist and short story writer. Her work has been widely translated and her stories anthologised and broadcast on BBC Radio 4. In 1997 she won the Flamingo/HQ National Short Story Prize in Australia. Awards for her novels In the Blue House (Bloomsbury, 2001), The Red Book (Granta, 2008) and To the Island (Granta, 2011) include a regional Commonwealth Prize, a Saltire Award and a nomination for the Orange Prize. Her short story collection Greta Garbo’s Feet & Other Stories (WordPower Women) was published in 2015 and longlisted for the 2016 Edgehill Short Story Prize. She taught Creative Writing at the University of St Andrews from 2005-2013 and at the University of Stirling from 2013-2016. She was on the judging panel of the International Dublin literary Award in 2016.

Tania Hershman

Tania Hershman

Tania Hershmans her third short story collection, Some Of Us Glow More Than Others, from which this short story is taken, was published by Unthank Books in May 2017 and her debut poetry collection, Terms & Conditions, by Nine Arches Press in July 2017. Tania is also the author of a poetry chapbook, and two short story collections, and co-author of Writing Short Stories: A Writers’ & Artists’ Companion (Bloomsbury, 2014). Tania is curator of ShortStops celebrating short story activity across the UK & Ireland, and is completing a PhD in creative writing inspired by particle physics. For more, visit www.taniahershman.com and you can hear her read some of her work at Soundcloud

Jessica Clements

Jessica Clements

Jessica Clements lives in Adelaide, Australia. She enjoys writing and reading short stories in all their forms and finds her bookshelves these days are crammed with a lot of debut collections by female authors. She has an MA in English from the University of Adelaide and has been published in various Australian literary magazines as well as online.

Vicki Jarrett

Vicki Jarrett

Vicki Jarrett is a novelist and short story writer from Edinburgh. Her first novel, Nothing is Heavy, was shortlisted for the Saltire Society Scottish First Book of the Year 2013. Her short fiction has been widely published and broadcast, shortlisted for the Scotland on Sunday/Macallan Short Story Competition, Manchester Fiction Prize and Bridport Prize. Her collection of short stories, The Way Out, was published last year by Freight Books and has been listed for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Prize, and the Edge Hill Short Story Prize.

Avril Joy

Avril Joy

Avril Joy is a Durham-based short story writer and novelist. Her short fiction has appeared in literary magazines and anthologies, including Victoria Hislop’s, The Story: Love, Loss & the Lives of Women: 100 Great Short Stories. She has been shortlisted in competitions including, the Bridport, the Manchester Prize for Fiction and The Raymond Carver Short Story Prize in the USA. In 2012 she won the inaugural Costa Short Story Award. Her novel, Sometimes a River Song, is published by Linen Press and currently nominated for the People’s Book Prize (Vote here!). She blogs regularly about writing and life at www.avriljoy.com.

Francesca Gilbert

Francesca Gilbert

Having written a lot as a child, Francesca Gilbert returned to writing through Write Like a Grrrl. Born and raised in Stockport, Francesca studied English Literature and Philosophy at Durham University before heading back to Manchester. She writes poems and short stories, and is currently finalising her first novel. @FGilbertWriter 

Rita Jacob

Rita Jacob

Rita Jacob was born in County Laois in 1987. She studied English Literature at UCD. Her short stories have appeared in the Dublin ReviewNew Irish Writing and The Moth. She received an Arts Council Bursary in 2015 to complete a short story collection. She lives in Dublin and is working on a novel.

Emma Hughes

Emma Hughes

Emma Hughes is a freelance journalist who’s written for newspapers and magazines including Time Out, ES, Stylist and the Telegraph. She has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Manchester and won The London Magazine’s 2016 Short Story Competition. She lives in south London, and is writing a novel.
Clare Fisher

Clare Fisher

Clare Fisher is a novelist, short story writer and creative writing teacher and editorial consultant.  Her debut novel All the Good Things was published by Viking, Penguin UK on 1st June 2017.  Her collection of very short fiction How The Light Gets In  is now published by Influx Press. Born in 1987 in Tooting, south London, she now lives in Leeds. She has a BA in History from the University of Oxford, an MA in Creative and Life Writing from Goldsmiths, University of London.

 

Alison MacLeod

Alison MacLeod

Alison MacLeod was born in Canada and has lived in the UK since 1987. She is the author of three novels, The Changeling, The Wave Theory of Angels and Unexploded, which was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize for Fiction 2013, and a collection of stories, Fifteen Modern Tales of Attraction. Alison MacLeod is the joint winner of the 2016 Eccles British Library Writer’s Award. She is Professor of Contemporary Fiction at the University of Chichester and lives in Brighton.

Kristien Potgieter

Kristien Potgieter

Kristien Potgieter is a writer and dancer from Johannesburg, South Africa. She currently resides in Bath, where she is doing a PhD in Creative Writing at Bath Spa University. She was the recipient of the prestigious UEA Booker Prize Foundation Scholarship on her MA at the University of East Anglia, and her short fiction has been published in Anomaly, Itch, and in a collection of South African short stories called Die Laughing. She is working on a children’s novel about a South African ballerina. Twitter: @ballet_bug_

C. G. Menon

C. G. Menon

C. G. Menon is the 2015 winner of the Asian Writer prize, The Short Story award and the Winchester Writers Festival award. Her work has been shortlisted for the Fish short story prize and published in a number of journals and anthologies, including The Lonely Crowd, the Willesden Herald anthology, Words and Women, and anthologies from Siren Press and Dahlia Press. She is currently working on her first novel, while studying for a creative writing masters at City University.

Bidisha

Bidisha

Bidisha is a British newspaper journalist, a film-maker and a broadcaster for the BBC, Channel 4 and Sky. She specialises in human rights, social justice, gender and the arts and offers political analysis and cultural diplomacy tying these interests together. She also does outreach work in UK prisons, refugee charities and detention centres. She signed the deal for her first novel, Seahorses, with HarperCollins when she was 16 and has since published one further novel and three non-fiction books. In 2013 she was an International Reporting Project Fellow, writing about global health and development issues. As of spring 2013, she is a trustee of the Booker Prize Foundation. Her most recent book, her fifth, is Asylum and Exile: Hidden Voices of London, published in March 2015, is based on her outreach work, most recently with young asylum seeker mothers (details here). This follows the 2012 publication of her internationally acclaimed reportage Beyond the Wall: Writing a Path Through Palestine. Her poetry has been published by Wasafiri magazine, Seagull Books, Saqi Books, English PEN and Young MWA magazine and performed internationally; she also reviews poetry for BBC Arts and Poetry Review.  She is currently part of the year-long City of Stories writers’ residency (details here) for London-based writers. Her sixth book Safe Journey Home, a collection of travel writing from Italy, India and China, is currently out on submission. She has just directed her first short film, An Impossible Poison, which will be available to view from mid-November 2017 onwards after premiering at the Breaking Ground festival in Berlin.
Danielle McLaughlin

Danielle McLaughlin

Danielle McLaughlin‘s stories have appeared in publications including the New Yorker, the Stinging Fly and the Irish Times, as well as various anthologies. She has won the Willesden Short Story Prize, the Merriman Short Story Competition in memory of Maeve Binchy and the Dromineer Literary Festival short story competition. Dinosaurs on Other Planets is her first collection.

Rosie Garland

Rosie Garland

Tagged ‘literary hero’ by The Skinny, Rosie Garland is an award-winning poet, novelist and singer with post-punk band The March Violets. With a passion for language nurtured by libraries, she started out in spoken word, garnering praise from Apples and Snakes as ‘one of the country’s finest performance poets’.
She is the author of Vixen, a Green Carnation Prize nominee. Debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities, won Book of the Year in the Co-op Respect Awards 2013 and was nominated for both The Desmond Elliott and the Polari First Book Prize. Her latest novel The Night Brother (Borough Press) was reviewed in The Times as “A rich and ambitious tale… Garland’s prose is a delight: playful and exuberant. There are shades of Angela Carter in the mad world she creates… Full marks.’ Her most recent poetry collection, As In Judy, is out with Flapjack Press. She is half of The Time-Travelling Suffragettes.

Jay Merill

Jay Merill

Jay Merill is a 2017 Pushcart Prize nominee and the winner of the Salt Short Story Prize. She has two short story collections published by Salt: Astral Bodies and God of the Pigeons. Her latest stories are forthcoming in Brilliant Flash Fiction, Firefly, The Irish Literary Review, Litro and The Lonely Crowd. Stories have appeared recently in 3AM Magazine, Bunbury Magazine, The Casket of Fictional Delights, Crannog Magazine, Flight Journal, The Galway Review, Minor Literature[s], The Nottingham Review, Platform for Prose, The Pygmy Giant, Story Shack and TMO Magazine. She is Writer in Residence at Women in Publishing.

Helen McClory

Helen McClory

Helen McClory lives in Edinburgh and grew up between there and the isle of Skye. Her first collection, On the Edges of Vision, won the Saltire First Book of the Year 2015. Her debut novel, Flesh of the Peach, was published by Freight in Spring 2017. There is a moor and a cold sea in her heart.

Emma Timpany

Emma Timpany

Emma Timpanys  debut short story collection, The Lost of Syros, was long listed for the Edge Hill Prize 2016. Her short fiction has been widely published and has won the Sara Park Memorial Short Story Award 2013, the Society of Authors’ Tom-Gallon Trust Award 2011 and the Society of Women Writers and Journalists’ Short Story Award 2011. Stars was one of the winning stories in Arachne Press’s Solstice Shorts Festival Competition 2014. A pamphlet of her stories, Over The Dam was published by Red Squirrel Press in April 2015. Emma was born and grew up in Dunedin, New Zealand. She currently lives in Cornwall.

 

 

Rebecca Ferrier

Rebecca Ferrier

Rebecca Ferrier is a UK-based ghostwriter and journalist. Her short stories have been featured in numerous anthologies. In 2015 she had a manuscript shortlisted for the Tibor Jones Pageturner Prize and celebrated by drinking inordinate amounts of gin and watching Miss Congeniality in her PJs.

Twitter: @rmlferrier

Rebecca F. John

Rebecca F. John

Rebecca F. John was born in 1986, and grew up in Pwll, a small village on the South Wales coast. She holds a BA in English with Creative Writing (1st class hons) and an MA in Creative Writing (distinction) from Swansea University, as well as a PGCE PCET from the University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

Her short stories have been broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and BBC Radio 4Extra. In 2014, she was highly commended in the Manchester Fiction Prize. In 2015, her short story ‘The Glove Maker’s Numbers’ was shortlisted for the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. She is the winner of the PEN International New Voices Award 2015, and the British participant of the 2016 Scritture Giovani project.

Her first short story collection, Clown’s Shoes, is available now through Parthian. Her first novel, The Haunting of Henry Twist, is forthcoming through Serpent’s Tail in 2017.

Alison Hitchcock

Alison Hitchcock

Alison Hitchcock is co-founder of From Me to You, a national campaign encouraging us to write letters to friends suffering from cancer. She also works with Word Factory, as well as teaching creative writing to disadvantaged adults
and children. She has a Master’s in Creative Writing from Birkbeck. She was runner-up in the inaugural SASH Writing Competition and is published in their anthology, Homeless (Stairwell Books, 2015). Her work has also appeared in
Mechanics’ Institute Review 12, The Interpreter’s House and Every Day Fiction. She has performed at The Word Factory, Waterstones Piccadilly, Vanguard, LooseMuse and Hubbub. Alison is now working on her first novel, a story wickedly subverting the conventions of family drama when a teenage boy comes to live with his career-hungry aunt in London.

Ann Patchett

Ann Patchett

Ann Patchett is the author of six novels and three works of non-fiction. She has been shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction three times; with The Magician’s Assistant in 1998, winning the prize with Bel Canto in 2002, and was most recently shortlisted with State of Wonder in 2012. She is also the winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and was named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in 2012. Her work has been translated into more than thirty languages. She is the co-owner of Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tennessee, where she lives with her husband, Karl.

Annemarie Neary

Annemarie Neary

Annemarie Neary is the author of three novels — The Orphans (2017) and Siren (2016), both from Hutchinson/Windmill (Penguin Random House), and A Parachute in the Lime Tree (2012) from The History Press Ireland. Her short stories have been published in many places in Ireland, the UK and the US, including The Glass Shore: Short Stories by Woman Writers from the North of Ireland. Awards for short fiction include the Michael McLaverty, Bryan MacMahon, Columbia Journal, WOW! and Posara prizes, and placings in the Bridport, Fish, and KSW Hilary Mantel prizes. She is currently working on a fourth novel and a collection of short fiction. @AnnemarieNeary1

Regi Claire

Regi Claire

Regi Claire is the author of two novels (The Waiting, The Beauty Room) and two story collections (Fighting It, Inside~Outside). Both collections were shortlisted for a Saltire Scottish Book of the Year Award. Fighting It was also longlisted for the Edge Hill Prize. The Beauty Room was longlisted for MIND Book of the Year.  Her work has appeared in Best British Short Stories and numerous other anthologies and literary journals in the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA, most recently in Litro Magazine and Unsettling Wonder.  Regi is a former Royal Literary Fund Lector and Fellow. She teaches creative writing at Edinburgh City Art Centre, the Writers’ Museum and the Museum of Childhood. She lives in Edinburgh with her husband and their dog, a golden retriever who accompanies her everywhere. She is currently completing her third story collection.

 

Karen E. Bender

Karen E. Bender

Karen E. Bender is the author of Refund, which was a Finalist for the National Book Award in fiction and shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Prize in 2015. Her fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Granta, Zoetrope, Ploughshares, Narrative, Story, The Harvard Review, The Iowa Review, and others. She is currently the Distinguished Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Hollins University. Visit her at www.karenebender.com.

Grace Brown

Grace Brown

Grace Brown is currently studying for an MFA Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia. Her journalism has featured in The Times, New Statesman, and the Herald, among others. She is working on a collection of short stories based on and around The Troubles. Hens was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature V S Pritchett Prize Memorial Prize 2017.

Sarah Salway

Sarah Salway

Sarah Salway is a novelist, poet and writer. Her books include the novels, Something Beginning With, Tell Me Everything and Getting the Picture, the short story collection, Leading the Dance and two poetry collections: You Do Not Need Another Self-Help Book and Digging Up Paradise.

Sarah regularly teaches Writing and Wellbeing in the community and for universities, and is a certified Writing and Creativity Coach. Her website is at sarahsalway.co.uk

Susmita Bhattacharya

Susmita Bhattacharya

Susmita Bhattacharya’s debut novel, The Normal State of Mind (Parthian), was published in March 2015. She is the winner of the Winchester Writers’ Festival Memoir competition 2016, and her writing has appeared in several magazines and journals in the UK and internationally including Structo, The Lonely Crowd, Litro, Wasafiri, The Bangalore Review, ElevenEleven (USA), Mslexia, Commonwealth Writers, Tears in the Fence, and on BBC Radio 4. She has recently moved to Winchester from Plymouth, where she taught English and hosted creative writing workshops.

Leon Craig

Leon Craig

Leon Craig was shortlisted for the 2016 White Review Prize. She won a Young Writer’s Award from theshortstory.co.uk She has had stories published on Litro.co.uk, Queen Mob’s Teahouse, Storgy.com and in Oxford’s NotesFlight Journal and Next Review. Leon’s work is forthcoming in The Frankenstein Anthology. Her short immersive play Ermine/ Stoat was put on at Babel Studios Southwark. Leon has performed at Polari/ LGBTQ History Month, Swimmers, At The Inkwell, That’s What She Said, L Fest and the Moth. She also presented Brainchild Festival Short Story Hour and is the editor of Thousand Zine (forthcoming).

Sara Baume

Sara Baume

Sara Baume‘s debut novel, Spill Simmer Falter Wither, was longlisted for the 2015 Guardian First Book Award, shortlisted for the 2015 Costa First Novel Award, and won the 2016 Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize.

Her story, Solesearcher1, won the 2014 Davy Byrne’s Short Story Award, and first appeared in an anthology of shortlisted stories published by The Stinging Fly Press. Her second novel, A Line Made by Walking, has just been published by William Heinemann. She lives on the south west coast of Ireland.

Pia Ghosh-Roy

Pia Ghosh-Roy

Pia Ghosh-Roy grew up in India and now lives in Cambridge. She is the winner of the 2017 Hamlin Garland Award. Her work has been placed, shortlisted and longlisted for several other awards including the Aestas Fabula Press Competition, the Brighton Prize, and the Bath Short Story Award. Pia is currently working on her first novel and a collection of short stories. Twitter @piaghoshroy

Isha Karki

Isha Karki

Isha Karki lives in London and works in publishing. Her work has appeared in Lightspeed Magazine, Mithila Review and Mslexia. She completed the Write Like a Grrrl course in October 2015 where she found a brilliant tutor and a support group any writer would envy. ‘Sister’ was first published in Mslexia and was runner-up in its Short Story Competition 2016.

Astra Bloom

Astra Bloom

Astra Bloom lives on a cliff near Brighton. She rarely leaves the house without a flask of tea under arm and she’s usually only going down the garden path to write fiction and poetry in a spidery shed. If she has a clean cardi on she’s going out.

Astra won the Bare Fiction poetry prize, she was runner up and Sussex winner in the Brighton short story prize twice; she’s been shortlisted for the Bridport short story prize, commended by Bristol prize and Brittle star magazine, and shortlisted by Live Canon poetry. She’s had two novels longlisted by the Mslexia international novel award and she has recently been selected by New Writing South and Kit De Waal as one of the writers to feature in Common People an anthology of working class writing. Her poetry can be found in Magma and Under the Radar.

Astra is currently removing surplus semi colons (which she loves but one can overdo!) from a short story and poetry collection, a modern feminist fairy tale novella, a YA novel and a children’s novel. She likes to write and read lots of things at once because life is so short.

The story ‘Telling Blue’ is very much a fiction piece, but it is grown from seeds of Astra’s own experiences. Astra feels that A Wild and Precious Life is the most beautiful home for this story, and she’s thrilled to be included in this brave, inspiring and necessary project. Astra is in recovery from a long and debilitating illness and trauma.

Find out more at A Wild and Precious Life

Sara Dobie Bauer

Sara Dobie Bauer

Sara Dobie Bauer is a bestselling, award-winning author, model, and mental health advocate with a creative writing degree from Ohio University. Her short story, “Don’t Ball the Boss,” inspired by her shameless crush on Benedict Cumberbatch, was nominated for the Pushcart Prize. She lives in Northeast Ohio, although she’d really like to live in a Tim Burton film. She is author of the paranormal rom-com Bite Somebody from World Weaver Press, among other ridiculously entertaining things. Learn more at SaraDobieBauer.com

Kirsty Gunn

Kirsty Gunn

Kirsty Gunn published her first novel with Faber in 1994 and since then has written five works of fiction, including short stories and a collection of fragments and meditations. Translated in over twelve territories, and widely anthologised, her books have been broadcast, turned into film and dance theatre, and are the recipient of various prizes and awards, including the Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year. A regular contributor to various newspapers and magazines, she is also Professor of Writing Practice and Study at the University of Dundee, where she established and directs the writing programme. She lives in London and Scotland with her husband and two daughters.

Gabrielle Barnby

Gabrielle Barnby

Gabrielle Barnby works in a variety of genres including short stories and poetry. In 2015 her first collection of short stories The House With The Lilac Shutters and other stories was published by ThunderPoint. In the same year she won The George Mackay Brown Short Story competition.

Gabrielle moved with her family to Orkney in 2011, where she runs writing workshops for children and is a member of the Stromness Writers Group. She has been published in Northwords Now and a selection of her poetry is included in ‘Waiting for The Tide’ produced by the St Magnus Festival Writer’s Course. In 2016 she was invited to compose a number of poems for the George Mackay Brown 20th Anniversary celebrations and a variety of her work has been published locally. Gabrielle edits and contributes to the monthly writing pages in Living Orkney.

Kelly Link

Kelly Link is the author of the collections Get in Trouble, Stranger Things Happen, Magic for Beginners, and Pretty Monsters. She and Gavin J. Grant have co-edited a number of anthologies, including multiple volumes of The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror and, for young adults, Monstrous Affections. She is the co-founder of Small Beer Press. Her short stories have been published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, The Best American Short Stories, and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. She has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Link was born in Miami, Florida. She currently lives with her husband and daughter in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Alix Christie

Alix Christie

Alix Christie is an author, journalist, and printer who published her debut novel in 2014. Gutenberg’s Apprentice (Harper/Headline) tells the story of the invention of printing and the making of the Gutenberg Bible. A dual citizen of the United States and Canada, she earned a Masters of Fine Arts from St. Mary’s College of California. She was a finalist for the 2016 Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award and has won the McGinnis-Ritchie award for fiction from the Southwest Review. A longtime foreign correspondent, she has reported from Europe for the Guardian, San Francisco Chronicle, Salon.com, Washington Post and many other publications. She currently lives in London, where she is at work on a second novel and reviews books and arts for The Economist.

Uschi Gatward

Uschi Gatward

Uschi Gatward’s stories have appeared in Best British Short Stories 2015 (Salt), Flamingo Land & Other Stories (ed. Ellah Allfrey, Flight Press), as a Galley Beggar Press Single and in the magazines The Barcelona Review, Brittle Star, The Lonely Crowd, Short FICTION, Southword, Structo and Wasafiri. She was shortlisted for The White Review Short Story Prize 2016

Keren Heenan

Keren Heenan

Keren Heenan is an Australian writer and Arts teacher. She is the winner of a number of Australian short story awards, including the Alan Marshall award, Southern Cross and Hal Porter competitions, also 2nd in the Fish Award (Ire) 2015. Her stories have been published in Australian journals and anthologies, including: Overland, Island, Wet Ink, Forty South Anthology 2015, and 2016, Award Winning Australian Writing 2010, 2011 and 2015, and in the Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual 2014, and Fish Anthology 2015 (Ire.) The story, To Swim the Purple Sea, won the local section of the Alan Marshall Award 2014, and has previously been published in Award Winning Australian Writing 2015.
Find her on Twitter @keren_heenan

Laura van den Berg

Laura van den Berg

Laura van den Berg is the author of the novel Find Me, longlisted for the 2016 International Dylan Thomas Prize and selected as a best book of 2015 by Time Out New York and NPR, and two story collections What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us and The Isle of Youth, both finalists for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Her honours include the Bard Fiction Prize, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Pushcart Prize, and an O. Henry Award. Laura is a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Fiction at Harvard University and lives in Cambridge, MA, with her husband and dog.

Sarah Armstrong

Sarah Armstrong

Sarah Armstrong’s debut novel, The Insect Rosary, was published by Sandstone Press in 2015. Her second novel, The Husk of my Little Apollo, will be published in 2017. Her short stories have been published in Mslexia and Litro, and she teaches creative writing for the Open University. Sarah lives in Essex with her husband and four children. She can occasionally be tempted into crocheting Adventure Time characters for her nieces. You can find her on Twitter as @sarahsiobhana

Emily Ruth Ford

Emily Ruth Ford

Emily Ruth Ford is a British writer and translator living in North London.  Before starting to write fiction, she spent ten years as a journalist, for The Times in London and Shanghai and for Agence France-Presse in Hong Kong and New Delhi. She has a degree in English from Oxford University and a Master’s in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia. She won the VS Pritchett Memorial Prize 2017 for her short story, The Hikers, and is currently completing her first novel.

Claire Fuller

Claire Fuller

Claire Fuller writes short stories, flash fiction and novels. Her stories have been published in many journals, and she has won the BBC Opening Lines competition, as well as the Royal Academy / Pin Drop short story prize. Her first novel, Our Endless Numbered Days won the 2015 Desmond Elliott Prize and was longlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award. Her second novel, Swimming Lessons was published in 2017, partly inspired by her love of books and swimming in the sea. Her third novel, Bitter Orange, will be published in August 2018. She lives in Winchester with her husband and has two grown-up children. 

Philippa East

Philippa East

Philippa East studied Psychology and Philosophy at Oxford University and now holds down a day job as a Clinical Psychologist. Her short stories have been published in various magazines including Brittle Star, the Lampeter Review and Fictive Dream, and been placed in a number of competitions. She lives in Lincolnshire where she is currently working on her first novel – the story of a family whose missing child returns home after seven years. Find her on Twitter @philippa_east

Paula McGrath

Paula McGrath

Paula McGrath lives in Dublin. Her first novel, Generation, was published in 2015. She has a background in English Literature and is currently a doctoral student at the University of Limerick. She received an Arts Council literary bursary in 2016, and was recently Irish Writers Centre Writer-in-Residence in St Mark’s English Church, Florence.

Diana McCaulay

Diana McCaulay

Diana McCaulay is an award winning Jamaican writer and environmental activist. She has written four novels, Dog-Heart, Huracan, Gone to Drift and White Liver Gal. Her short fiction has appeared in Granta, Eleven Eleven, The Caribbean Writer and Afro Beat. She won the regional Commonwealth Short Story Prize for her story The Dolphin Catcher in June 2012.

Farah Ahamed

Farah Ahamed

Farah Ahamed is a short fiction writer. Her stories have been published in The Massachusetts Review, Thresholds, Kwani?, The Missing Slate, Out of Print among others. She was highly commended in the 2016 London Short Story Prize, joint winner of the inaugural Gerald Kraak Award and has been nominated for The Caine and The Pushcart prizes.

Peggy Riley

Peggy Riley

Peggy Riley is a writer and playwright living on the North Kent coast.  Her first novel, Amity & Sorrow was published by Little, Brown (USA/Canada), Headline/Tinder Press (UK/Commonwealth/Ireland, and was translated for publication in France, Italy and the Netherlands.   Her short fiction has been published in MsLexia and the Sunday Express and was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize in 2011 and the Costa Short Story Award 2015. She has been a festival producer, a bookseller, and writer-in-residence at a young offender prison.

Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan is a professional daydreamer. She is the author of The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales (Salt, 2014) and The Gracekeepers (Harvill Secker, 2015). She lives with her girlfriend and their rescue dog in Glasgow, where she mostly reads ghost stories, drinks coffee, and dreams of the sea. Her latest book is a collection of stories inspired by Scottish folktales, A Portable Shelter (ASLS, 2015).

Sarah Vincent

Sarah Vincent

Writing as Susan Davis, Sarah Vincent has had stories published in lit mags and anthologies including: Panurge, Metropolitan, Raconteur, Momaya Review, Staple, Chapman, All Hallows, Best New Horror an Mslexia. She’s also been long-listed for Fish, short-listed for the Asham Award and broadcast on Radio 4. In the early noughties she published a Y/A trilogy with Random House, the first book of which is ‘The Henry-Game’.

‘The Testament of Vida Tremayne’ came out with Three Hares Publishing in Nov. 14 under the pseudonym Sarah Vincent. ‘The Gingerbread Wife’ a collection of magic-realist and supernatural stories is published May 2016.

Zillah Bethell

Zillah Bethell

Zillah Bethell was born in Papua New Guinea, is a graduate of Wadham College, Oxford and now lives in Tondu, south Wales, with her husband and two young children. She has published two novels for adults as well as several short stories and her upcoming novel for children, A Whisper of Horses, will be published in autumn 2016 by Piccadilly Press.

Hannah Leffingwell

Hannah Leffingwell

Hannah Leffingwell is a graduate student at NYU, where she will begin her PhD in French Studies and History this autumn.  A graduate of Mount Holyoke College, Hannah is a writer, translator, and outspoken feminist.  In her research, she is committed to studying and sharing the voices of queer women, as well as refining her own.  She is co-author of Femme for Femme, a blog dedicated to the intersections of feminism, queerness, and femme identity.

Riona Judge McCormack

Riona Judge McCormack

Ríona Judge McCormack was the 2016 Hennessy New Irish Writer of the Year, and the recipient of the 2017 Sunday Business Post Short Story Prize and the inaugural Galley Beggar Press Short Story Prize. Her work has been published in The Irish Times, The Dublin Review and a number of international anthologies, and broadcast nationwide on Ireland’s RTE Radio One as part of the RTE Francis McManus Award.

Erin Soros

Erin Soros

Erin Soros has published fiction and nonfiction in international journals and anthologies and her stories have been produced for the CBC and BBC as winners of the CBC Literary Award and the Commonwealth Award for the Short Story. Her story “Fallen” was recently awarded second place for the Costa Short Story Award.

She has been a writer-in-residence at four universities, including Cambridge where her position as the Harper-Wood fellow of St. John’s College funded travel to research the oral history of Inuvialuit communities in Canada’s Western Arctic.

Katherine Gutierrez

Katherine Gutierrez

Katherine Gutierrez is a short story writer currently studying Creative Writing at Roehampton University. She won the 2015 John Hopkins Poetry Prize and her work was included in two Fincham Press Anthologies, ‘Purple Lights’ and ‘Screams and Silences’.

Harriet Kline

Harriet Kline

Harriet Kline won the London Magazine Short Story Competition 2013 and the Hissac Short Story Competition 2012. She was highly commended in the Manchester Fiction Prize 2014 and has been shortlisted and longlisted elsewhere. She has been broadcast on BBC Radio 4, has a story at Litro online and at shortstorysunday.com. She reads short stories almost every day.

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Chloe Turner

Chloe Turner

Chloe Turner is a recovering accountant from Gloucestershire. Her short story ‘Long-gone Mary’ was recently published by In Short Publishing as an individual pocketbook. She has previously been published in Hark magazine, in the 2011-2015 Stroud Short Story Anthology, and in Kindred magazine (US). She was shortlisted in the 2015 Frome Festival Short Story Prize and the 2015 Fiction Desk Newcomer Prize.

Sunny Singh

Sunny Singh

Sunny Singh was born in Varanasi, India. She read English and American Literature at Brandeis University, USA. She has a Masters in Spanish Literature from Jawaharlal Nehru University, Delhi and a PhD from the Universitat de Barcelona. She teaches Creative Writing, Literature and Film at the London Metropolitan University.  She has contributed to a collection selected by Khushwant Singh, stories in honour of Ruskin Bond, American anthologies, Drawbridge Magazine, International PEN etc. An expert on Bollywood, her book on Amitabh Bachchan shall be published by BFI/Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. Sunny Singh’s latest novel, Hotel Arcadia, was published by Quartet in 2015.

 

Michelle Green

Michelle Green

Michelle Green is an acclaimed poet-turned-short story writer, and a well-loved figure on the Manchester spoken word scene. She has performed across the UK, both solo and in collaboration with musicians and visual artists, at festivals such as the Big Chill, as well as on BBC Radio 4. She has published her poems and short stories in numerous magazines and anthologies (including Bitch Lit and City Secrets), and her first collection of poetry – Knee High Affairs – was published by Crocus in 2006. Jebel Marra is her first collection of fiction and is based on her own experience as an aid worker in Darfur.

Zoe Gilbert

Zoe Gilbert

Zoe Gilbert is the winner of the Costa Short Story Award 2014. Her work has appeared in anthologies from Comma, Cinnamon, Labello, and Pankhearst presses, and has been published in journals including The Stinging Fly, Mechanics’ Institute Review, Lighthouse, and the British Fantasy Society Journal. In 2015 she appeared at the Beijing Bookworm Festival in China on behalf of the British Council and was commissioned by Microsoft to create a short story book. She chairs the Short Story Critique Group at Waterstones Piccadilly and co-hosts the Short Story Club at the Word Factory. She is also the co-founder of London Lit Lab, providing creative writing courses for Londoners. She is working on a PhD in Fiction and Creative Writing at the University of Chichester, focusing on the influence of folk tales on contemporary short stories. She lives in Sydenham, London.

Valerie O'Riordan

Valerie O’Riordan

Valerie O’Riordan‘s writing has appeared in Fugue, Sou-wester, Litro, The Penny Dreadful, and elsewhere. A graduate of the MA in Creative Writing at the University of Manchester (and, soon, the PhD), she’s a former editor of The Manchester Review, and a one-time winner of the Bristol Short Story Prize (2010). She co-runs the review site, Bookmunch, and is both an editor at The Forge Literary Magazine and a member of its parent organisation, the international online writing collective, The Fiction Forge.

Leone Ross

Leone Ross

Leone Ross is a novelist, short story writer, editor and lecturer in fiction writing. She was born in England and grew up in Jamaica. Her first novel, All The Blood Is Red was published by Angela Royal Publishing in 1996 and translated into French. The novel was longlisted for the Orange Prize in 1997. Her second critically acclaimed novel, Orange Laughter was published in the UK by Anchor Press, in the USA by Farrar, Straus & Giroux and Picador USA and in France by Actes Sud.  Her short story collection, Come Let Us Sing Anyway, is available on June 5th and published by Peepal Tree Press.

Holly Müller

Holly Müller

Holly Müller is a writer and musician. She teaches Creative Writing at the University of South Wales and sings in the band Hail! The Planes. My Own Dear Brother is her first novel. Holly Müller lives in Cardiff.

Nina Allan

Nina Allan

Nina Allan was born in London and grew up in the Midlands and West Sussex. She wrote her first story at the age of six, and since then her fiction has been published in many magazines and anthologies. Her novella reimagining the Arachne myth, Spin, won the British Science Fiction Award in 2014, and her story-cycle The Silver Wind was awarded the Grand Prix de L’Imaginaire in the same year. Her debut novel The Race was shortlisted for the British Science Fiction Award, the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and the Kitschies Red Tentacle.

Fiona Mitchell

Fiona Mitchell

Fiona Mitchell is an award-winning writer and worked as a journalist for twenty years. She spent almost three years living in Singapore and now lives in London with her husband and daughter. The Maid’s Room, published by Hodder & Stoughton, is her first novel. She is currently working on a second.

To find out more, visit Fiona Mitchell, and connect with her on Twitter @FionaMoMitchell

Lindsay Parnell

Lindsay Parnell

Lindsay Parnell’s short fiction has appeared in 3AM Magazine, Underground Voices, The Prague Revue and Black Heart. Her debut novel, DOGWOOD, has recently been published by Linen Press. Additionally, she shares a birthday with eighth wonder of the world, Meryl Streep.

Eliana Ramage

Eliana Ramage

Eliana Ramage holds a BA and MA in creative writing from Dartmouth College and Bar-Ilan University, respectively. A Cherokee Nation citizen, she is at work on a collection of linked stories concerning indigenous girls and women. She recently won the Grazia Deledda International Literary Prize, and her stories have appeared or are forthcoming in the Beloit Fiction Journal, the Baltimore Review, and Four Chambers.

‘Kin Selection’ will be published in (RE)Sisters, the For Books’ Sake YA anthology, forthcoming in 2016.

Evangeline Jennings

Evangeline Jennings

Evangeline Jennings only writes because she can’t play guitar. In 2015, her story No Christmas was short-listed for the Saboteur Award for Best Novella of the year. It didn’t win, which sucks. Born and raised in Liverpool where she learned to fight, Evangeline now lives in Austin, Texas. Yes, she owns a gun and a horse. No, she’s not a woman-hating, bible-bashing bigot. ‘Firebird’ is the opening story in Evangeline’s noir-as-fuck crime fiction collection, Riding in Cars with Girls.

Angela Readman

Angela Readman

Angela Readman is the winner of the Saboteur Awards 2015 Best Short Story Collection for Don’t Try This at Home. Angela’s stories have appeared in a number of anthologies and magazines, winning awards such as the Inkspill Magazine Short Story Competition and the National Flash Fiction Competition. In 2012 she was shortlisted for the Costa Short Story Award for ‘Don’t Try This at Home’ – an award she would go on to win in 2013 with the story ‘The Keeper of the Jackalopes’. Angela is also a published poet.

Mahsuda Snaith

Mahsuda Snaith

Mahsuda Snaith is a writer of short stories, novels and plays.  She is the winner of the SI Leeds Literary Prize 2014 and Bristol Short Story Prize 2014 as well as being a finalist in the Mslexia Novel Competition 2013.  Her short stories have been anthologised by The Asian Writer, Words with Jam and Bristol Short Story Prize.

Emily Bullock

Emily Bullock

Emily Bullock won the Bristol Short Story Prize with her story ‘My Girl’, which was also broadcast on BBC Radio 4. She worked in film before pursuing writing full time. Her memoir piece ‘No One Plays Boxing’ was shortlisted for the Fish International Publishing Prize 2013 and her short story ‘Zoom’ was longlisted for the Bath Short Story Prize 2014. She also won the National Writers in Education Conference (NAWE) Short Story Competition in 2013. She has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia and completed her PhD at the Open University, where she also teaches Creative Writing.  Her debut novel, The Longest Fight, was published by Myriad in February 2015.

Jenn Ashworth

Jenn Ashworth

Jenn Ashworth’s first novel, A Kind of Intimacy won a Betty Trask Award in 2010. After the publication of her novel, Cold Light, in 2011, she was featured on the BBC’s Culture Show as one of the UK’s 12 best new novelists. Her short stories have appeared in the MIR 9, The Manchester Review, Dogmatika, Beat the Dust, Jawbreakers and Bugged, among other places.  In 2013 her third novel, The Friday Gospels, was published by Sceptre. She lectures in Creative Writing at Lancaster University.

Zoe-Lambert

Zoe Lambert

Zoe Lambert is a short story writer. The War Tour was published in 2011 by Comma Press, and was shortlisted for the Edge Hill Prize. She has been published in numbers anthologies, and is currently completing a novel. She lectures at Lancaster University. ‘Keynote‘ was written with the collaboration with Dr Andrew Philippides, from the University of Sussex and drew inspiration from his research into ant behaviour.