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The Goldfinch to be Adapted for Film

10th Mar 2014

The Goldfinch to be Adapted for Film
Donna Tartt's bestselling novel The Goldfinch has been optioned by the outfit behind the adaptation of The Hunger Games. What have they got in store for Theo Decker?

Color Force are no strangers to literary adaptations, with both The Hunger Games and Diary of A Wimpy Kid in their back-catalogue, but, with a book admired for its ‘Dickensian’ scope and named by The New York Times Book Review as one of the top ten novels of 2013, The Goldfinch looks to be a massive undertaking.

Released in October 2013, The Goldfinch is Tartt’s third novel following The Secret History in 1992 and The Little Friend in 2002.

It follows thirteen year-old Theo Decker as he suffers the loss of his mother in a bombing whilst visiting The Metropolitan Museum of Art. In a bizarre chain of events, Theo survives the attack and finds himself in possession of a painting – The Goldfinch by Cabrel Fabritius.

After spending some time in the Upper East Side with the wealthy Barbour family, Theo reluctantly reunites with his estranged father – a gambler and alcoholic who has set up home in Las Vegas upon walking out on Theo and his mother in favour of his new girlfriend, the amphetamine fuelled Xandra.

Nina Jacobson, CEO of Color Force spoke to TheWrap:

“We are looking for the right filmmaker, and then we’ll choose the right home based on that filmmaker…We’ve been thinking we are more likely to make a limited series for TV. There’s so much scope to the book. At the same time, a filmmaker could could come in with a perspective that changes our mind.”

It’s still unclear as to whether the book will be adapted to television or cinema, though, in terms of the big screen Lionsgate seem a likely choice – the folks responsible for the distribution of The Hunger Games and The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn.

What do you think? Should The Goldfinch be a TV mini-series or go the whole hog for a cinematic extravaganza? Who would you like to see play Theo?

Image courtesy of BBC Arts & Culture.